Storytelling Comparisons

Here’s an interesting question that Bob Sacha raised: what is the best way to communicate a story? Print, multimedia, TV broadcast or radio? Bob noted that in December 2011, four media outlets (NYTimes – print, NYTimes – multimedia, NPR – radio and Buffalo TV News – TV) ran the same story about an 82-year-old jazz pianist from Buffalo, NY. Bob provides links in his blog post. He also asks the questions:

  • Which worked well?
  • What did each version leave out?
  • How did each version start and finish?

But, ahem, Bob didn’t answer his own questions. So here’s my take on the strengths of two of the four forms:

PRINT
Strengths:

  • Imagination and visualization: because you don’t have images, you form (mental) images. I can picture a young, lythe Adelaide down in North Carolina…
  • Information and backstory: Print can easily include tid-bits about Mr. Dunlop’s arrival at the nursing home 4 years ago, how he played in the Army and at nightclubs, etc.

Weaknesses:

  • Slow to get through. This is particularly a problem on the web. I do a lot of my web reading when I’m in front of a screen, like, for instance when I’m (ahem) at work. Can’t dilly-dally too long there.

MULTIMEDIA
Strengths:

  • Audio – both narration and ambient sound enrich the experience. Hearing Mr. Dunlop’s voice adds character, richness and a closeness you just don’t pick up in the print version.
  • Visuals – same. Well-crafted images here are a joy to behold. Warm colors. Great lighting. Wow.
  • Information and backstory: I also pick up information about Mr. Dunlop, particularly throught some images of him getting medical attention from a nurse and the sound of his voice. It’s not as “factual”, but it is backstory and information about the qualities of this man.

Weaknesses:

  • Slow to get through. This may be even a bigger a problem than print. People do a lot of browsing at work, and it’s probably easier to explain reading a story than watching a slideshow if the boss walks up. Makes me kinda’ nervous as I watch it.

Multimedia as Grant Documentation

Chance Multimedia, a denver-based multimedia firm, produces videos and photography for foundations, nonprofit organizations and businesses. Here, Chance did a video highlighting a non-profit organization to communicate the group’s message, document the group’s activities and (presumably) bolster the group’s image for future grants.

 

Thoughts?

My initial reaction is that despite some distractions (e.g., lip synch problems, background noise in some portions), the piece works to communicate the group’s message and impact in the community. Emotionally it’s neutral, but I get information. I contrast that with another multimedia piece (shown below) covering the work of MAG, a non-profit organization dedicated to removal of landmines in former conflict areas, done by MediaStorm in 2011. The Chance documentary communicates information; the MediaStorm piece connects emotionally. You judge: which makes a greater impact?

Surviving the Peace takes an intimate look at the impact of unexploded bombs left over from the Vietnam war in Laos and profiles the dangerous, yet life saving work, that MAG has undertaken in the country. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/clients/surviving-the-peace-for-mag

Simple Storytelling Tool: Soundslides

Here’s an example of a simple, but very effective, storytelling tool called Soundslides. Soundslides allows photographers to present their visual work in a sequence (i.e., a slideshow) accompanied by an audio track. Soundslides automates the sequencing of images (users just adjust the duration of each image as it flashes across the screen. Soundslides also makes adding an audio file very simple. In fact, that’s the whole premise of Soundslides: ridiculously simple storytelling. And that’s a great concept.

Brian Vander Brug of the Los Angeles Times strings together short profiles of Las Vegas residents, each telling their stories, in his Soundslides multimedia piece entitled “Chasing the Dream“.

Soundslides can be purchased online for $39.95 (basic version) or $69.95 (Pro version). I’d get the Pro version.

Marc Maurice – the Interview

In an earlier post I introduced Marc Maurice and his short film, “The Soundtrack of My Life.” I contacted Marc and he agreed to provide some additional background on his work.

Q1. Can you tell me something about your storytelling planning process? You mention using the iPhone to hold your preplanned shot list. Do you also use a storyboard — or is your planning mainly text?

Maurice: I start with a brainstorming, collecting my creative and technical ideas in one simple spreadsheet as text (I use APPLE NUMBERS) that ultimately builds the script. Here’s a small demo how it looks (click image for a larger version):

One minute you may have a voice over text idea, the next a camera movement idea, then you think of a location… it all goes into the spreadsheet. It will often need refinements: say you found a nice voice over sentence and connected a shot idea. Then you imagine an additional picture, split the voice over sentence over 2 lines and add the new picture idea etc. In this stage I tend to read the dialogue / voice over sentences over and over again and imagine the pictures for it. This helps to build the timing of the story at an early stage. I always try to visualize the finshed film as I would like to see it as a viewer.

Usually I start in a linear (storytelling) order and divide the lines in story-chapters. Once you finish the story you want to see different views of the sheet: for example beside the chronological order you want a version that shows all the scenes sorted by location or by actors. For this reason I copy the locations / names etc. to every line. Then I just mark the column I’m looking for (for example “Location”) and sort the column alphabetically, which rearranges to whole sheet. Before I do this I make sure that I filled the first column at the left with incremental line-numbers (can be done by marking two fields and dragging down with your mouse…). By this I can always sort back to my chonological order of the story. Of course you need to update the “story-order” numbers if you change the script.

During the shooting you might use a printed version of the sheet to check off the scenes you already shot. I like to use my iPhone with the the mobile version of NUMBERS to be able to edit the document: 1st for last-minute changes and 2nd for an additional column in which I enter “X”, to check off the finished scenes. I recommend an iPhone clamp to attach it on your rig. If your need to get the phone out of your pocket all the time its likely that you aren’t checking back often enough. If I work with a team, I prefer to use the iPad (if somebody else holds it).

SOUNDTRACK OF MY LIFE was shot under crazy time pressure… I was astonished that I could (well… almost) finish and edit the film in such a short timeframe: I believe a major reason was this way of planning details in advance. I would like to see the workflow of other producers… maybe they have better workflows. I guess my story planning is working best if you work either alone or in a small team that understands your “roughly described scenes”. I use my sheets for commercial projects as well, though I might show clients a filtered version with just the basic columns. I present the spreadsheets by reading and explaining them in a meeting. Instead of a storyboard I might just bring along some reference photos for important scenes. My clients might not be able to visualize the finished film in their mind in this presentation this, as we do as film-makers, but they usually can follow far enough to make sure that our vision is synchronized and approve the script.

Additional storyboard pictures for each / some lines of the spreadsheet are nice for bigger teams / projects. Instead of sketching a storyboard I like to use reference-photos I shoot by myself when I check the location. Sometimes I also use some photos I find with Google or at stock photo services etc. as a reference.

For less complex projects I started to use the shotlist tool in SMAPP, the terrific iPhone app for film-makers.

Q2. How did you develop your storytelling / preplanning skills?

Maurice: I admire great storytelling in all artforms (words, music, movies, photographs) and I have enjoyed telling stories by myself from an early age. So I was always curious how to keep up the attention of “the audience” (catch interest, build excitment, suprise, have the right timing,…). A big influence was songwriting. Songs — as little stories — need a dramatic strucuture. You follow rules that are very comparable to a filmscript: a song has an intro that wants to attract attention and maybe curiosity, than you develop the story (verse), calm down or increase the tension (bridge) and accel to a climax (chorus / middle section) etc.

I think the more stories you write the more you indirectly train your planning skills. You kind of have to learn to structure your ideas somehow. You might do this intuitively or –like me — more in a considered way, depending on your personality.

Q3. What were your thoughts as you searched for and incorporated the soundtrack into this piece?

Maurice: The song was part of the contest and caught my attention first. I guess without the inspiring song I wouldn’t have joined. While listening to the song my theme and the first pictures came to my mind. Regarding the sounds: I sorted my script sheet (see above) by the column SoundFX, prepared all the props and recorded them after the shooting with a TASCAM DR 100 recorder (just a few were ambient noise or came from samples libraries). Actually I planned to use quite a few more sounds but I coulnd’t make it in the short time I had.

Q4. You created this film for a contest. Was that valuable for you — did it change the way you work or planned for this film?

Maurice: I can’t express how valuable it was as a personal reflection and motivation to go for “my voice”! I started with film when the 5DII hit the market – films were one additional service next to music and photography. Since then I actually went for payed jobs only. Far too long I failed to reserve some time for creative freedom and to remember what emotionally connected me with film. STILLMOTION’s BIG SHORT contest was my first personal movie and it certainly infuenced my approach for upcoming commercial projects: instead of adapting my style to the project I’ll adapt the project to style I want to pursue…

It was also the first time I ever put something on VIMEO for a public discussion (yeah, I know – embarrassing…). I enjoy the interaction that arises from this a lot. STILLMOTION is so kind to to show the shortfilm on their workshop tour KNOW… I appreaciate the feedback a lot. Whatever come out from a contest: I’m sure it will somehow get you further… even if it is just for the fun and experience of it.

Q5. Are there any other filmmakers or multimedia artists that you’re following or can recommend?

Maurice: I find the best school are your favorite “big screen” movies / tv-dramas and documentations. I like national originalities as well: for example french and english movies can have very unique and inspiring atmospheres for me. In the DSLR / documentation world I follow a couple of websites: the Stillmotion Blog, Philip Bloom, Vincent Laforet, Shane Hurlbut, dsrlnewsshooter, and lately Audibleyeball :-), … and find all the insight and work samples you find there very inspiring.

New Project: The IRC in Tucson

I’m starting a new project about the International Rescue Committee (the “IRC”) in Tucson, Arizona. The project is a documentary on the work that the IRC does, and will involve filming a Bhutanese refugee who now lives in Tucson.

Here’s a concept board that I put together after speaking with the IRC last week (click image for a larger version):

In an introductory meeting with the IRC, we spent some time discussing the project, what points were important to highlight and which elements we could omit or minimize. I resorted to my low-tech method of writing ideas on post-its as we spoke, and then slapping them on a large foam-core board. We then moved the post-its around, took them off, grouped them together, rearranged, etc as we homed in on our ideas. It’s low-tech, but effective. To bring things back to the Twenty-First Century, I snapped a photo of the final post-it arrangement on my iPhone.

The above sketch is what I developed after looking back over the final post-it arrangement. Interpretation:

  • The story will span past, present and future
  • Much of the drama occurred in the past: the 2 “journeys” that our protagonist experienced (from home to a refugee camp, and then after some years in the camp, from the refugee camp to Tucson, AZ). But these journeys will not be the focus of the project.
  • The focal point of this project will be the protagonist’s 3rd journey, which is more of an emotional journey than a physical journey. The protagonist has arrived in a foreign land (the desert vs. the mountains of Bhutan), amidst a new culture, surrounded by a new language, strange people and new customs. His challenge is to adapt to his new homeland.
  • In effect, the final journey is his effort to “return” to the comfort and familiarity of his old home — by building a new home in Tucson, AZ. The protagonist will need to replace strange things with familiar things, piece-by-piece, as he moves from the present into the future. The IRC tells me that many refugees find this final step of replacing their old lives with new lives the most traumatic of the three journeys that refugees take. The IRC’s program that I’ll profile helps in that effort by “returning” the refugees to their identity as farmers working the land together as a community, growing food.
  • At the bottom I’ve began laying in ideas about how I’ll communicate the storyline in imagery and sound. More on this later.

Marc Maurice: The Soundtrack

Marc Maurice has created an intriguing short film to submit to StillMotion for a contest. The StillMotion contest theme was __. Marc, who has been shooting weddings and “corporate films for companies without the budget / room for storytelling,” knocked one out of the park with this gem.

I’ve contacted Marc and we’re swapping messages about a conversation as time permits. In the mean time here’s a bit of backstory that Marc provided:

“The story-background of SOUNDTRACK OF MY LIFE was following the recommendation “to look for stories in your own life first”… it was about some of my own memories. The basic idea was coming out quickly after reading about the STILLMOTION contest, but then I invested quite some time into the script-details, working it out very similar to a song (intro, verse, chorus, bridge…), planning the scenes, gear, camera moves, equipment, props, sounds, etc., in a big spreadsheet (with NUMBERS so that I had it on the iPhone while shooting). Nicely prepared the reality turned out differently: we shot most of the film in a crazy time pressure due to the contest time-schedule. I believe people with their head on straight (incl. a part of myself) would have give the project up more than one time.

“I shot 50% of the film 7 hours before the edit was finished, because my lovely little actors arrived late from their holidays… no way to find others.

“Since we shot in our holidays in the homeland of my girlfriend, Portugal, we had good and bad points: we knew we’ll have beautiful places, but I could only take along a minimum of gear (7D, Glidecam, photo tripod, table dolly). Instead of my slider I just used the table dolly on a wooden board that I bought at a local store jn Portugal: I fixed it with a studioclamp on a photo-tripod! Sounds like MacGyver? No, no, in reality it didn’t work that cool, but in emergency situations…

“I finsighed the film 30 minutes before the deadline … no sleep, 6 a.m. in the morning, 2 hours(!!) before our flight back home… and guess what… the internet connection failed in our apartment! Uploading via iPhone? No chance! So we had 2 options: missing the flight and uploading from a friend or flying home, missing the contest deadline! We flew… Back home, a few hours later, I sent Patrick Moreau the film (and let him know what happened) just for their “possible personal enjoyment”. I didn’t expect to be listed … but he wrote me back and presented the film at the contest site while noting it won’t qualify for the main prizes… which was of course no problem at all… I was just happy to “somehow complete the project” and maybe get some constructive feedback!

“I learned so much at this point from the little SOUNDTRACK OF MY LIFE production:

– how fulfilling and motivating it is to work on something you really love
– don’t care about gear too much (actually I am known as the opposite)
– even wildly improvised scenes can work out beautifully
– better be fast with kids and entertain them well :-) GET TOYS / PRESENTS BEFORE!!
– you can work out so much in NO TIME if you stick to it
– preparing a very detailed script helps SO MUCH to put the puzzle pieces together in the end
– left out ideas (and I had to leave out quite a few because of the schedule) are not necessarily a problem
– show your personal work in the internet, socialize and enjoy critics and compliments
– go for the films you really want to do and go the clients who fit to your films.”

MediaStorm – Online Training

MediaStorm offers web-based multimedia training. I’m going through the 1-year “all access” subscription for all existing training modules (plus any additional modules they put out within the next 12 months). Obviously there’s some risk (maybe they won’t post any additional training), but based on the reputation of MediaStorm and the multimedia stories that I’ve seen them produce, I took that risk. I felt additional modules would be gravy; I gambled that $199 is worth what’s already out there.

I’m so-so on the products so far.

The MediaStorm online training is broken into modules. There is a “Reporting Track” (covering audio, stills and video for multimedia) that was, frankly, not particularly insightful. Most of that information is already available online or through other sources. I don’t think the content in that one “Reporting Track” module warrants the separate $99 price tag (if you buy it alone).

In addition to the “Reporting Track” there is a “Post-Production” track. I haven’t gone through that module.

I did, however, listen to “The Making Of: Surviving the Peace” which was flat-out outstanding. That module is a steal at $50 (if you buy it separately). Rick Gershon and Brian Storm take viewers through the 18-minute “Surviving the Peace” film, dissecting the structure and techniques employed in capture and editing. It is really, really interesting to see all the decisions made in the course of building this film. Get this!

The online subscription also entitles subscribers to two additional “The Making Of” modules:

  • The Making Of: A Thousand More, and
  • The Making Of: The Amazing Amy

I’ve started “The Making Of: A Thousand More” and I’m not as impressed with it yet as with “Surviving the Peace.” I have a way to go, so I don’t want to judge the quality prematurely, but it looks to me as if MediaStorm launched this “A Thousand More” module before the “Surviving the Peace” module — and they improved the training module in the second round. The earlier module isn’t divided into logical segments, and I don’t find the exhange between the producers as crisp and insightful. But as I said, I’m just starting so I’m still hopeful.

I’ll keep you posted.

Time-Lapse on Steroids: Dream Music

It’s long, but it’s also mesmerizing: a time lapse tour-de-force. Most amazing is that these artists were able to reposition and take frames with the mouth synch so well timed and integrated. 6-8 hours of work for each 3-4 seconds of footage? 6 months to do? Yeah, I can see that.

Marc Donahue is a 31 years old from Los Gatos, CA, graduated college at UCSB, filming and editing for 12 years. He specializes in Film, Lyric-Lapsing, Stop Motion, Motion Control Timelapse, Music Videos, Commercials & Wedding Services.

Sean Michael Williams is 27 years old from San Jose, CA. Sean graduated from San Diego State University, and has been filming and editing for 6 years. He specializes in Film production, Lyric-Lapsing, Stop Motion, motion Control Time-lapse, Music Videos, Commercial campaigns & Wedding Services.

Q1. Where did the idea to push time lapse to this extreme come from?

Donahue/Williams: We’ve been working on a number of different timelapse techniques for years. We recently got sponsored by dynamicperception.com that makes motion controlled timelapse devices. After years of experimenting we combined all our production techniques together and came up with lyric-lapsing, a stop motion timelapse effect that creates a surrealistic feeling.

Q2. How are you doing this — especially synching up the lip movement with the songs so effectively? Can you describe your process (without giving away the secret sauce)?

Donahue/Williams: Like I said before we have been experimenting with different techniques. Combining tedious movements within intervals of time allow us to create such powerful cinematography. We have a number of videos that kind of show you the process on my vimeo account (https://vimeo.com/permagrinfilms)

Q3. You say, “Our goal was to pioneer a new film genre by telling a story through art and music.” Can you tell me a little more about that?

Donahue/Williams: We wanted to push the progression of time-lapse and lyric-lapsing into the online short film world. We wanted to create an artistic story in a way that had never been done before. Our goal was to make Part II a unique experience that would be different than anything else on the internet. We aimed to seamlessly weave a visual narrative within the lyrics of 3 different songs and maintain a unified story.

Q4. Where would you like to take this time-lapse technique next?

Donahue/Williams: We really want to hook up with a big time artist and create a music video and get into some commercial gigs. We’d also like to take this technique and travel the world, showing all the fascinating places, and make travel documentaries.

Q5. Is this project linked in any way to the wedding videography that you’re doing? I think there are some pretty innovative things coming up out of the wedding videography business. Any interesting things you see developing there?

Donahue/Williams: Wedding videography is how we get paid. We do however use sliders and timelapses and actually the last wedding I filmed last Saturday I used this technique with the couple, after showing them the video on youtube. So yeah we are starting to apply it to other avenues.

StillMotion’s KNOW Workshop


 

I recently attended a multimedia/filmmaking workshop put on by Toronto-based StillMotion. The company is hosting 36 workshops in cities around North America in the Fall of 2012. I recommend attending one of the storytelling skills sessions (roughly 9:00 AM – 5:30 PM). (I didn’t find the evening editing session to be as good: if you’re new to editing I think it would flow too quickly and if you’re familiar with editing I think you’d be familiar with most of what they covered.)

Here’s what I liked:

  • StillMotion’s presenters were experienced and very competent. I was very, very impressed with their work product: both wedding films and commercial work. (And StillMotion’s commercial clients are pretty “premier”, like Showtime, Callaway, the NFL, etc.).
  • StillMotion emphasized connecting EMOTIONALLY to subjects/characters being filmed.
  • StillMotion provided a step-by-step walk-through of two projects (a wedding highlights film and a commercial project), plus they discussed a third feature-length film project in detail. This was really interesting, as they took us through how the projects originated, how they worked with clients to prepare for the shoots, specific decisions they made when shooting and editing the films — and the rationale behind these decisions.
  • The presenters were young and enthusiastic. Helpful over a long workshop (which started at 9:00 AM and finished at 9:30 PM).
  • The presentation format was relaxed and informal.
  • StillMotion stressed using tools and techniques for specific purposes, not just for cool effects. They repeated that message often to drive the point home.
  • StillMotion demo’ed the equipment they use, including a simple DSLR filmmaking kit they typically use “for 90% of a shoot”.

If you can attend the one-day workshop I think you’ll come away impressed.  Even if you’re familiar with a lot of the gear and techniques, these folks do outstanding work and you’ll learn from how a commercial shop approaches it’s clients and keeps production humming along.

 

Ryan Libre and Documentary Arts Asia

I recently heard an interview with Ryan Libre on The Candid Frame Podcast (www.thecandidframe.com – well worth investigating). I was impressed with Ryan’s interest in documentary photography. He discussed in particular his project to document the Kachin culture and independence movement (winner of the 2010 Nikon Inspiration Award).

Ryan also discussed his work forming Documentary Arts Asia (www.doc-arts.asia), which is a non-profit organization located in Chiang Mai, Thailand and working regionally. When I looked into Documentary Arts Asia (“DAA”) I was REALLY impressed and decided to contact Ryan for an interview to learn more about what he’s doing.

Ryan was raised in Northern California but now calls Chiang Mai, Thailand, his home. He has lived in various parts of Asia for over 10 years, having first started his photography career with a self-assigned project to document the largest national park in Japan. In addition to founding and running DAA, Ryan teaches photography workshops and continues his photographic projects.

Q1. Looking back on your experience as a documentary photographer, what skills and attributes do you think best equip a person to be successful?

Libre: To be a successful documentary photographer you need curiosity, passion and 12+ hours days. On top of that to be any kind of successful photographer you need to balance technical mastery and creativity. Many people are too far to one side.

Q2. You started out as a photographer, but now it looks like a lot of your time is spent helping others develop skills at or actually produce documentary work. Why the transformation?

Libre: Why is a huge question, but in a nutshell because it is deeply needed. Especially in the places like Kachin State where i am shooting myself and teaching as well.

Q3. Do you find producing and helping others produce to be equally satisfying?

Libre: Yes, and in many cases more satisfying. When i see my students get shots that would be hard for even myself to get or giving someone their first solo exhibition. These are a few of the many rewarding moments.

Q4. You formed DAA in 2008. What were your original ideas for the organization? How have your ideas evolved since 2008?

Libre: My original goals were to start to shift the documentary production from visitors who stay a few hours or maybe days to locals who live there and also shift the output of the projects that are taken from major international hubs to regional hubs close to where the story was shot and to the area being documented itself.

The plan has not changed goals really but has grown in scope a lot. I found just teaching was not enough to keep people engaged. Teaching plus a gallery to show the students and others work was more appealing. Then I added grants, then an artist in residence, then a library, then a theatre, then a festival, then an agency, now a publishing house and on and on. The more I added programs the more interesting it got and the more they supported each other.

Q5. Part of DAA’s charter is to “assist with the production and promotion of documentary projects which exist outside the standard remit of mainstream media, particularly those which represent the needs of marginalized communities and under-reported issues.” Is the assistance you provide primarily technical (such as teaching photography/video/storytelling skills) or exchanging ideas/advising/critiquing work as it develops? What types of projects have developed with DDA’s help?

Libre: The assistance DAA gives is broad and deep. It goes far beyond technical. We train, mentor, critique, make connections, support gear loans, scholarships to other workshops, provide funding, give outlets for completed work, sell work to give the artists funds and inspiration and much more.

Nothing to too basic or too big for us. DAA teaches people how to upload a photo to the web to connecting new artists with the best galleries in Asia, what ever is needed at that time for that person.

Much of the programming comes from a list I made of things that would have helped me a lot 10+ years ago when I was getting started. I tried to make everything on the list available to others.

Q6. It looks like DAA has a broad scope: gallery operations, an annual festival, workshops, a theatre to offer film screenings, an artist-in-residence program, etc. Which offerings are in highest demand? Are most participants local residents, or are you drawing people in from outside of Thailand? Is there anything you still want to offer but haven’t yet put in place?

Libre: DAA’s events are the most popular, we bring in directors and photographers to show and speak about their films and projects and that is always special and usually brings in 50-300 people. Our festival, the Chiang Mai Documentary Arts festival, brought in a huge crowd from all over Asia the first year. Next year’s festival looks to be even much bigger and better. www.cdaf.asia As much as we offer there are still many more programs I have plans to implement, but with no outside funding we are at the very max now.

Q7. You launched your artist-in-residence program in late 2011. How has that been received? Will the program change over time? What are your long-term plans for the artist-in-residence program?

Libre: Artist in residence programs are very new in Asia, especially SE asia and i dont know another documentary photography AIR in Asia. So we are spearheading this on many levels. All things considered it was well received, but we will work hard to make it even better next year. Long term plans are for the program to include a documentary photographer and film maker at the same time and also to make it four times a year. So a revolving door, as one AIR leaves the next one is coming and we have a big welcome / farewell party 4 times a year.

Q8. On a personal level, with so much going on with DAA, do you have time to photograph? What current projects are you working on?

Libre: I still shoot quite a lot all things considered. I am still actively shooting my 5-year project with the Kachin Independence Organization in Burma and some assignments as well. DAA is based on a team and community who all support our core goals and help out, so I still put in a huge number of hours but can walk away from time to time and trust the team and community who all want to see DAA succeed as much as I do.

Q9. How can people get involve or support DAA?

Libre: Many ways, like buying a print from our online gallery, or license an image from our photo agency. We also have a crowd-funding campaign to fund the first DAA photobook and documentary DVD, donate a book from our wishlist. Finally, we are a registered NGO, but we have no grants as of now. We’re always interested in potential grants to apply for to help fund some of our programs.